Stevie Wonder and a Pop Music Daffynition

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Stevie Wonder, born Stevland Hardaway Judkins in 1950, is one of the most influential artists of Motown. Born blind, he began his professional musical career at the tender age of eleven. In order to start a tribute to the man called Stevie Wonder properly, here is a joke: Why can’t Stevie Wonder see his friends? Because he’s married.

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Wonder’s first hit under the name Little Stevie Wonder was “Fingertips Part 1 in 1963, which led to cameo appearances performing in the movies, Muscle Beach Party and Bikini Beach. At this early point of his career, he was more of a performer, slowly building up his songwriting chops. He enjoyed life with the hits, “Uptight (Everything’s Alright)” [1965], “Hey Love” [1967], “I Was Made To Love Her” [1968], “Shoo-Be-Doo-Be-Doo-Da-Day” [1968], “My Cherie Amour” [1969], “Yester-Me, Yester-you, Yesterday” [1969], “Signed, Sealed, Delivered I’m Yours” [1970], and “If You Really Love Me” [1971]. With each passing year, you can hear the maturation of a songwriter; an impressive collection of hits from a teenager.

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Stevie jams, Burt judges.

1972 is a benchmark year for Stevie. He turns 21 years old. Taking a page from Marvin Gaye, he demanded that Motown give him greater creative control and a bigger percentage of copyright moola. This golden period is where Wonder transforms from child prodigy to musical genius.

 

 

Music Of My Mind [1972]

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There is a huge growth spurt with this release. Stevie plays 99% of the instruments. It is the beginning of brilliant things to come. Contains one of my favorite singles, “Superwoman (Where Were You When I Needed You)”.

Talking Book [1972]

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Back in the golden days of vinyl when an artist could actually release two records in one year, unlike today, when an artist is considered prolific if they have output every two and a half years. “Superstition”, “I Believe (When I Fall in Love It Will Be Forever)” and “Maybe Your Baby” are the highlights.

Innervisions [1973]

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Essential listening for any serious “music person”, if you haven’t, do. Now. Without being a concept album, there is a very cohesive sense of purpose. Hopping from genre to genre with lilt and ease, this album never falters.

Fulfillingness’ First Finale [1974]

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More maturation. It is a solid album, kind of like God taking the seventh day off to rest.

Songs In The Key Of Life [1976]

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Two-record release, near perfect blend of pop and rhythm and blues; it was critically acclaimed by everyone, even David Duke. [FACT CHECK: Probably not.]

Stevie Wonder’s Journey Through “The Secret Life of Plants” [1979]

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This is an ambitious recording with a very weak premise. I listened to it recently, and it’s not as bad as I remember, thus the half star.

Hotter Than July [1980]

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The last record that Stevie Wonder made that has any relevance, and it’s damn good. It’s another blend of different musical genres and the perfect soundtrack for a hot day.

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Stevie still stoned from McCartney kush.

1983 was a difficult year for many of us with the release of “Ebony And Ivory” by Paul McCartney featuring Stevie Wonder. I have this crazy theory. If you’re going to collaborate with McCartney, don’t smoke his weed. History has shown that after anyone has “collaborated” with the ex-Beatle, the artist’s mind turns to mush. Look at Stanley Clarke, Michael Jackson, and Elvis Costello.

Applying this theory to Stevie Wonder, he released “I Just Called To Say I Love You” followed by more crap. The closest he came to former glory was the soundtrack to Spike Lee’s Jungle Fever [1991].


Stevie Wonderection

/Stē/vē/ /Wən/dər/ek/sh(ə)n/

noun

euphemism for an ecstatic blind penis having intercourse with anything

synonyms: randy Jackson, dirtiest martini, horny blind fuck gone amok

“At summer camp, I saw a dude sleepwalk and stick his Stevie Wonderection into an electrical socket, he earned a serious afro merit badge.”

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“Many men have Stevie Wonderections when there is a full moon, which explains the ensuing chaos.”

#SurprisedThatJamesAndStevieNeverMetBut…

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